FALKEDON AND ST CHERRIES

  • Early history
  • History of Lambert Gorwyn’s Falkedon (today’s Falkedon Farmhouse)
  • History of Battishill’s Falkedon (today’s Cann’s Falkedon, Falkedon Linhay and Barn, and Crofters Barn)
  • History of St Cherries and neighbouring cottages
  • Fields belonging to Falkedon in 1842 [in preparation]
  • Census returns for Falkedon and St Cherries
  • Deeds relating to Falkedon in the public archives

The name is thought to mean ‘homestead of the falcons’, so presumably it was a homestead known for falcons nesting near it. Over the centuries Falkedon has been spelt in more different ways probably than any other name in Spreyton. Variants include Falketon (1270); Folketon (c.1392); Falcadon, Falkadon (1524/5); Fawkedon (1564); Fawton (1707); Faulkendon, Falkadon (1729); Falkingdon (1737);Faccaton (1758); and Faggaton (on Donn’s 1765 map of Devon). The pronunciation until recently was as indicated by these last few versions – i.e. faccaton.

Early history

Falkedon was part of the Manor of Spreyton, which was granted by William the Conqueror to his companion Baldwin, who became Earl of Devon. The earldom descended to the Courtenay family who, sometime in the 12th century, granted the Manor of Spreyton to a family called Talbot. The Courtenays may, however, have retained control of part of Falkedon, as there is a reference to ‘Folketon’ in the inquisition post-mortem of Margaret de Courtenay in 1392 (inquisitions post-mortem were enquiries that were done into the property of deceased land holders in the Middle Ages to ascertain whether they owed anything to the monarch), and in 1422, the inquisition post-mortem of Hugh de Courtenay also mentioned Falkedon.

Generally, however, ownership of most parts of Falkedon seems to have remained co-terminous with that of the manor. By the end of the 16th century, the Manor of Spreyton had passed from the Talbots into the hands of the Kelly family of Kelly in West Devon. The Kellys were a prolific family and over the years ownership of Spreyton, including Falkedon, became split between three different branches of the family, one of which had a half share and the other two a quarter each. For the residents of Falkedon, these changes of ownership would not have meant much.A bailiff acting on behalf of all three owners probably collected the rents. However, every time a new tenant arrived, he had to sign separate leases with all three owners, which partly explains the large number of deeds connected with Falkedon. The lawyers who had to be employed to draw up the many leases no doubt regarded the Falkedon properties as a pot of gold.

Just to complicate matters, by the 17th century Falkedon had been divided in to a number of separate holdings and had developed into what was quite a little hamlet. A 1644 list of rents records no fewer than eleven people paying rent for properties at Falkedon, although some were probably cottagers with very small plots.

Distinguishing between these various holdings is difficult. A large number of deeds relating to the various parts of Falkedon have survived and are in the Devon Record Office. These documents refer to Higher Falkedon, Middle Falkedon, Lower or Lesser Falkedon, Great Falkedon and Cann’s Falkedon. Just to complicate matters further, mistakes were sometimes made, and the names of the various holdings changed over time. A lease of 1738 refers, for instance to “Great Falkedon (wrongly called Middle Falkedon)”, and a lease of 1714 refers to “Cann’s or Middle Falkedon (wrongly called Higher Falkedon)”. The Ordnance Survey did not help by mapping two of the farms in the late 19th century as “Lower Falkedon”. There was also a certain amount of buying or selling of fields – or even gambling between the owners using fields as stakes – which has left the boundaries between the holdings with some strange quirks.

There were also a number of cottages, of which St Cherries and the three cottages (now a single dwelling) opposite the main Falkedon house are all that remains. There used to be a cottage called Little Silver (first mentioned in 1758) on the road just south of St Cherries, which was still inhabited until the Second World War, and another tiny cottage on the other side of the Spreyton road just north of St Cherries that was also inhabited well into the 20th century. But they fell into disrepair and were allowed to disintegrate. 17th and 18th century leases refer to various dwellings that may be yet other vanished cottages, and 19th century census returns also refer to now unknown dwellings.

Extract from the 1888/9 Ordnance Survey map showing the different buildings at Falkedon

Extract from the 1888/9 Ordnance Survey map showing the different buildings at Falkedon

In the 17th century, the owners of Spreyton Manor were beginning to sell off the farms on the Manor. The various parts of Falkedon were acquired piecemeal by a family called Battishill based at Spreyton Barton, until the whole of Falkedon was in their hands. From then on, it becomes easier to trace the history of the various parts of Falkedon, although a number of mysteries and contradictions remain.

History of Lambert Gorwyn’s Falkedon or Great Falkedon

Falkedon Farmhouse, as it is now known, was probably the Lower Falkedon referred to in the early deeds. It seems to have been a medium-sized farm, with its fields mostly to the east of the farmhouse. In 1730, it was described as consisting of one messuage (dwelling), one garden, one orchard, 30 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow, and 40 acres of furze and heath. Its land was bounded by the river Troney on the east side; Croft Lane to the north-east side and the green lane to Rugroad on the north-west side (although it also had some fields on the other side of the road from Rugroad);the Spreyton-Whiddon Down road on the south side (although again there were a couple of fields on the other side of the road, possibly won at cards as they are an enclave in Higher Falkedon); and to a line just south of Cann’s Falkedon to the south.

The handsome two-storey house was built in the mid-1600s as a traditional Devon long-house, although probably around the core of an earlier hall-house. This 17th century building was probably added to in the 18th century (it has two inglenook fireplaces, one in what was possibly a slightly later kitchen wing) and has been altered at various times since. It was cob and thatch, but the thatch was replaced by slate in the late 1950s when the 2nd Viscount Lambert decided to replace all the thatch roofs on his estate with slates, as being cheaper and more fire-proof. It has a front garden with high walls, in which an old double privy can still be seen. The farmyard is the other side of the house and the farmland is now in separate ownership. The farmhouse and the garden walls are Grade II listed, described by English Heritage as follows:

Farmhouse. Mid-17th century (probably earlier core), refurbished in the 18th century, modernised in the early 19th century. Plastered cob on stone rubble footings; stone rubble stacks, one still with its original granite ashlar chimney-shaft; asbestos slate roof, formerly
thatch.

Plan and development: 3-room-and-through-passage plan house facing south-east. At
the left end is the inner room. It has a gable-end stack but this might be a 19th century
insertion. The room was probably a dairy formerly. The hall has an axial stack
backing onto the passage. The service end room is a parlour with a projecting gable-
end stack. A kitchen block projects at right angles to rear of the inner room and
has a large gable-end stack, and a granary block projects at right angles to rear of
the service end parlour. Although only 17th century and 18th century features can be seen the plan of the house suggests 16th century origins as an open hall house. It is now 2 storeys
throughout.

Exterior: irregular 3-window front of mostly 19th and 20th century casements with glazing bars although there are, at the right end, 19th century 16-pane sashes; one to the parlour and another to the chamber above, the lower one is taller. The passage front doorway
contains a 19th century 6-panel door (another similar to rear), the door-case has panelled
pilasters and the flat hood rests on shaped brackets. The roof is gable-ended. At
the back of the granary there is an external flight of stone steps up to the first
floor doorway.

Interior: no carpentry is exposed in the service end parlour. The earliest feature
here is an18th century crockery cupboard with shaped-shelves. The fireplace here is blocked by a 20th century grate. The hall has a large granite fireplace with a soffit-chamfered and straight cut-stopped oak lintel. The crossbeam is soffit-chamfered with step stops (and including one pyramid stop). The inner room fireplace has a 20th century grate and no carpentry is exposed. The kitchen has suffered a fire which burnt out the fireplace lintel and charred the crossbeam. There is a good deal of 18th century joinery detail throughout the house including 2-panel doors hung on H-hinges and cupboards with panelled doors. Roof is inaccessible but the bases of straight principals show
suggesting A-frame trusses, probably 17th or 18th century.

The front garden is enclosed by a tall wall. Most of it is cob on stone rubble
footings with tile coping but the south-west side (alongside the lane) was rebuilt in
the 19th century in local stone rubble.

The front of Falkedon Farmhouse in the 1950s

The front of Falkedon Farmhouse in the 1950s

The farmhouse seen from the road in the 1950s

The farmhouse seen from the road in the 1950s

The road side of the house, 1950s.

The road side of the house, 1950s.

Thatched barn in the 1950s or 1960s.

Thatched barn in the 1950s or 1960s.

Lambert Gorwyn’s Lower Falkedon (now disappeared). Next to Falkedon was another farm which has now disappeared. It was just north of the Great Falkedon farmhouse. Access was by both a lane off the road leading to Falkedon from Falkedon Cross and another lane leading off from Croft lane.By the 19th century this holding had become incorporated into the main Falkedon farm.The 1842 tithe apportionment survey refers to “houses”, so what was originally a farmhouse could by then have been turned into two cottages to house farm labourers when the holding became part of the main Falkedon farm. Michael Lambert recalled that there was a date on the fireplace of the farmhouse. The buildings were still standing in the 1960s and 1970s and were sufficiently weatherproof for hay and straw to be stored there. But in May 1979 there was a fire and the buildings were burnt out. Now all that remains is the debris of a wall hidden among brambles. This property was marked on the 1888/89 Ordnance Survey map as one of two “Lower Falkedons” (see Battishill’s Falkedon below for the other).

Chronology

Late 1600s-early 1700s: the Battishill family of Spreyton Barton acquired the freehold of various parts of Falkedon from the owners of Spreyton Manor. One branch of the family moved to what is now Falkedon farm.

1730s – 1750s: Thomas Battishill of Falkedon ran into money problems. He first mortgaged and then finally sold his part of Falkedon. The purchaser was John Cann of Fuidge, who passed it to one of his younger sons, William Cann.

1800: William seems to have given the use of the property to his brother George, another younger son, as at the time of William’s death in about 1800 George was at Falkedon, whereas William was living at Howard in Hittisleigh. Maybe William had lived there at an earlier stage, as he appears to have had a fondness for the place. In his will, he desired that his body be buried in Spreyton Church under Falkedon Pew in a coffin of good English oak with a double cover, and for his body to be conveyed in a bier from Howard to Falkedon, where his brother George was residing, and for it to be lodged there for one night before his burial. William’s heir and next owner of Falkedon was his brother George Cann.

1804: George Cann died at the age of 74 in 1804, as a result of a fall from his horse.He bequeathed the bulk of his property, of which Falkedon was only one of several farms, to George Lambert Gorwyn (1763-1837), the son of his sister Mary, who was probably also his godson. George was a canny operator who ended up owning almost 2,000 acres in Spreyton, Hittisleigh, Cheriton Bishop and Drewsteignton.Falkedon was his home for over 30 years. He was widowed fairly early on, and was looked after by a housekeeper (to whom he left a coaching inn in Crockernwell). It does not seem to have been an entirely happy household, as two teenage female apprentices (probably training to become domestic servants) committed suicide there, according to the parish records. This was not necessarily the fault of George or his housekeeper; apprentices were often disturbed children from dysfunctional families who had been cast onto the parish because their parents could not or would not care for them. But George certainly seems to have been a brooding presence, known towards the end of his life as “the old man of Falkedon”.

1837: George Lambert Gorwyn had quarrelled with his only son, another George, and when he died in 1837, he cut George off with a shilling (literally). He left Falkedon and his other farms in Spreyton to his grandson, a third George, who was still a minor at the time of his inheritance. The trustees of George senior’s will decided to let Falkedon to a tenant farmer until the heir had reached his majority. They sold all the furniture, farm stock and equipment (and there was a lot of it) at a huge auction. Because of a later court case, a list of every item and its sale price has survived in the National Archives and makes fascinating reading.

1837-1957: and for the next 120-odd years Falkedon was let to a series of tenants, most of whom stayed only a short time (the Lambert Gorwyn family had made their home at Coffins and later dropped the Gorwyn from their name).

1885: George Lambert Gorwyn the third died and bequeathed his estates, including Falkedon, to his only son, George Lambert (1866-1958), who later became the local MP and was raised to the peerage.

1904: The Sampson family took over the tenancy of Falkedon and remain there until the 1950s. The original tenant was George Sampson and his wife Emily. They had a number of children, of whom a daughter (Gladys) and two or three of the sons did not marry and carried on until they were too old to manage such a large farm. They made their own butter, which they used to sell to neighbours, probably against regulations. They eventually moved to the smaller farm of Rugroad in the 1950s.

1958: George, 1st Viscount Lambert died and his estate was inherited by his son, the fifth George Lambert (MP for Torrington and then 2nd Viscount Lambert). He took over the land belonging to Falkedon and farmed it himself with Coffins. He let his brother Michael use the farmhouse at Falkedon, and from then on house and farm were effectively separated. Falkedon was sold, along with the rest of the Lambert estate, in 1972 following the death in a car accident of the fifth George’s son.

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History of Battishill’s Falkedon (Higher Falkedon) and Cann’s Falkedon

The Battishills of Barton retained control of the rest of their Falkedon holdings until 1913. The last of the Battishills was the childless William Harrington Battishill. He died in 1881 and his property, including Falkedon, passed to his nephew John William Battishill, who was a solicitor in Exeter. John William died in 1913, and the whole of the Battishill estate was sold at auction. Falkedon passed into the hands of Francis Hamlyn, who had also bought Spreyton Barton.

In 1922, Tom and Jane Riddaway from Ashreigney rented the top of the three cottages opposite Great Falkedon (now called Cann’s Falkedon), along with a few fields on the Westwood side. The Riddaways came from a labourer’s family but wanted to have their own farm. They also took on the buildings belonging to Cann’s Falkedon across the road, which they used as their farmyard. The other two cottages were at the time both let to other people. Gradually the Riddaways took on more land, first in 1924 the “island” field between the two roads, then 1938 land on the other side of the road to Whiddon Down, including what is now Lower Falkedon or Crofters Barn, then other fields.The result was a farm of over 170 acres.Harold, their son, finally bought the freehold of all three cottages and the land in about 1963. They turned the cottages into a single dwelling with store-rooms at the lower end, thus ending up with a good sized farm and farmhouse – a real Devon success story.

In terms of the present buildings:

  • Lower Falkedon or Crofter’s Barn seems to have the centre of an important farm, and is probably the Higher Falkedon referred to in the deeds. However, it had become Lower Falkedon by the time the Battishill estate was sold in 1913 (and also on the 1888/89 Ordnance Survey map shown above). It was a large farm; in 1842, it consisted of 184 acres, stretching roughly from the green lane opposite St Cherries on the north to the river Yeo on the west, to Headland Lane on the South and the river Troney and Westwood on the east. In the 18th century Higher Falkedon farm appears to have been smaller – a deed describes it as consisting of one messuage, one garden, two orchards, 20 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow and 40 of furze and heath).Curiously, the tithe apportionment map show no garden or curtilege where Crofters Barn is, but just a couple of buildings; the 1905 Ordnance Survey map, however, shows what looks like a functioning farmyard. Access was by a track across fields taking off from the green lane opposite St Cherries. The Riddaway family of Cann’s Falkedon recall hearing that it had been a long-house, which was being done up when it burnt down about 1920. The remaining decaying buildings were used by the Riddaways to store straw and hay and to house cattle. The cattle shed (of which little more than a stone wall remained) has now been converted into a house, and another shed into garages.
The converted buildings at Crofters Barn

The converted buildings at Crofters Barn

  • Cann’s Falkedon (previously Falkedon Cottages). In fact, Cann’s Falkedon is a misnomer; strictly the name applied to the farmyard across the road (now Falkedon Barn and Linhay). The building started life as a longhouse, with its own farm. At an earlier stage, it seems from the deeds that this farm was called was Middle Falkedon.It was transformed into three cottages for farm labourers cottages probably in the early 19th century, and the land added to Battishill’s Lower Falkedon. The barn or linhay on the other side of the road from the main Falkedon farmhouse used to belong to it (it was sold to George Cann in the 1750s) and was probably the remnant of a more complete set of farm buildings.At the time of the tithe apportionment map in 1842, the cottages are shown as an integral part of Higher Falkedon farm, and the building was probably converted into cottages to house farm labourers in the early 19th century. Because of the close proximity of the building to the original Cann’s Falkedon (see below), it seems at times to have been regarded as part of it (a 1757 deed refers to Middle Falkedon or South Falkedon or Cann’s Falkedon). So its current name is not wrong, and at worst merely carries on the long tradition of name swapping that has characterised the Falkedon estate. It was Grade II listed in 1988, described as follows:Farmhouse, once 3 cottages but originally a single farmhouse. 16th and 17th century. Plastered cob on stone rubble footings; stone rubble and cob stacks topped with 19th century brick; thatch roof. Plan and development: 4-room-and-through-passage plan house facing east and built down a gentle slope. There are 2 inner rooms uphill at the left (south) end. The end one appears to be a secondary enlargement of a stair turret. The original inner room has an axial (former gable-end) stack backing onto that extension. The hall has an axial stack backing onto the passage. The service end room has a projecting gable-end cob stack with a winder stair rising alongside to rear. Probably in the 19th century the 3 main room units were subdivided into separate cottages. The refurbishment associated with this is hiding much of the evidence for the early development of the house. Nevertheless it is clear that the original house was some form of open hall house. The service end room is also a complete mid-17th century rebuild as a kitchen. The house is now 2 storeys throughout. Exterior: irregular 5-window front of C19 and C20 casements. The oldest, the first floor window over the passage doorway, contains rectangular panes of leaded glass. Most of the rest have glazing bars but the latest do not. There are 3 front doorways from when it was 3 cottages. That to left is an insertion into the inner room but that right of centre (with a side light) is the passage front doorway. Both these contain C20 doors, the former behind a C20 porch. The right doorway inserted into the service end room has a solid frame containing a C19 plank door. Roof is hipped to left and gable-ended to right. Interior is largely the result of the C19 superficial modernisation. Both hall and inner room fireplaces are blocked and their ceiling beams boxed in. The walls are plastered and the joinery detail c19. In this section the only feature exposed earlier than the 19th century is the lower section of the 16th century hall roof truss, a side-pegged jointed cruck. The roofspace is inaccessible and therefore it is not known whether it is smoke-blackened from an open hearth fire. The service end kitchen however has exposed mid 17th century features. The crossbeam is soffit-chamfered with scroll stops, the same finish given to the oak lintel of the rubble fireplace. The fireplace contains a 19th century cloam oven. The date 1809 inscribed on the lintel may date the subdivision of the farmhouse to cottages. Roof here carried on an A-frame truss with pegged lap-jointed collar with dovetail halvings. This is an interesting and attractive multi-phase Devon farmhouse in which most of its 16th and 17th features are hidden under 19th century plaster.
Cann’s Falkedon (former Falkedon Cottages) in 2012

Cann’s Falkedon (former Falkedon Cottages) in 2012

  • Falkedon Barn and Falkedon Linhay are the converted remains of a farmyard called Cann’s Falkedon in 1842. At that time, it had 24 acres of land attached to it. Originally, there seems to have been a farmhouse with the farmyard, but all trace of this has long disappeared (the 1842 tithe list referred to “houses and court”, as do the 1913 sale documents, but they may not have been occupied). In the 16th and 17th centuries, one part of Falkedon seems to have been the home of a younger branch of the Cann family of Fuidge, which adjoins Falkedon. There are for instance a number of references to “John Cann of Falkedon” in the parish records.The Canns appear to have given up their interest by the end of the 17th century, but this holding seems to have continued to be called “Cann’s Falkedon” long after they left it. By the end of 19th century, Cann’s Falkedon had effectively become incorporated into the then Higher Falkedon (later known as Lower Falkedon). When the Riddaways moved in, this became their farmyard. They were very traditional farmers, and the cob and thatch barn and linhay remained very much in their original form, until they were converted into the present residences.Both the barn and the linhay were Grade II listed in 1988, described as follows:

    Linhay. Probably late 17th-early 18th century. Cob on stone rubble footings; thatch roof. Plan and exterior description: originally open-fronted (the tallet/hayloft still is), the linhay faces north. It is built across and terraced into the hillslope. It is 6 bays. The tallet/hayloft is carried on a series of roughly finished crossbeams which, on the front, rest on monolothic granite posts. From the top front end of each crossbeam an oak post rises through the tallet/hayloft curving at the top and lap-jointed onto the outer principal of an A-frame truss with pegged lap-jointed collar. The one exception, at the left end, is a true cruck. This is Alcock's linhay type S2. The roof is gable-ended. At the back, near the centre, there is a hayloft loading hatch with an old, maybe original, oak frame. It could be loaded from the terrace. This, and the barn nearby (q.v.), are now rare examples of still-thatched traditional Devon farm buildings. This linhay is altogether a particularly well-preserved example.

    Barn. Probably late 17th-early 18th century. Cob on stone rubble footings; thatch roof. Plan and exterior description: threshing barn built on a north-south axis. Opposing doorways in the centre of each long wall. Both are flanked by short projecting midstrey walls and have solid doorframes. The western doorway is really full height and contains double doors but the eastern one is smaller. Both contain probably 19th century plank doors. The western doorway is now recessed behind secondary lean-to store sheds and the thatch of the main roof is carried down continuously over them. The main roof is gabled to north and half-hipped to south. The barn is open to the roof which is carried on a series of A-frame trusses with pegged lap-jointed collars. This
    barn, and the nearby linhay are now rare examples of still-thatched traditional Devon farmbuildings.
Falkedon Linhay in 2011

Falkedon Linhay in 2011

Falkedon Barn in 2011

Falkedon Barn in 2011

History of St Cherries

According to Place Names of Devon, “St Cherries” is a corruption of “sanctuary” in the sense of consecrated ground (although they base their assertion on hearsay). The little cottage which used to stand on the corner of the green lane opposite St Cherries was built on glebe land, so the name may come from some association with the church.

Originally, the building appears to have been a small cob and thatch farmhouse built in the 17th century, so it probably was a small farm with some land of its own. The thatch was removed in the late 1950s, greatly to its disadvantage.

St Cherries was part of the Manor of Spreyton. The first reference to St Cherries so far traced in the archives is in a deed of 1736, when Nathaniel Risdon, one of the then part-owners of Spreyton Manor, let his quarter of St Cherries to one Benedict Nethercott. In 1842, St Cherries belonged to the Battishills who owned the neighbouring Lower Falkedon. But they appear to have sold it to the other neighbouring landowner, George Lambert Gorwyn. Both landowners probably either put their farm labourers in it or let it out (it had by then been divided into two cottages). For a time in the 19th century, part of the building was a smithy and in the mid-20th century there was still a room called the “penthouse” (because of its sloping ceiling) with signs of where the horses were tied up. Sometime probably in the 1920s one of the two cottages was let to William Powlesland (who had previously rented Croft) and his family, and his daughter Emma remained there until the 1960s. The other half was a tied cottage for labourers working for the Lamberts of Coffins.

It is Grade II listed, and the 1988 English Heritage description is as follows:

Two cottages, formerly a farmhouse. 17th century, enlarged in the 19th century, probably when subdivided. Plastered cob on stone rubble footings; stone rubble stack-topped with 19th and 20th brick; corrugated asbestos roof, formerly thatch. Plan and development: 2 cottages facing south either side of a large axial stack serving back-to-back fireplaces. The left (western) cottage seems to have two rooms of the 17th century house, the larger right one with the fire-place and small central room. The left end room (next to the road) is a former blacksmith's shop added in the 19th century and brought into domestic use in the 20th century. It is not clear how much of No 2, the right (eastern) cottage is original. 20th century front lateral stack to right end room. Both cottages now have rear doorways. Because of later alterations it is not possible to work out the original layout although some type of 17th century lobby entrance house is suspected. Both cottages are 2 storeys. Exterior: overall irregular 8-window front, 5 to Nos. 1 and 3 to No. 2, of various 19th century and 20th century casements and roof is hipped both ends. Both rear doorways contain 20th century doors with contemporary porches. Interior is largely the result of extensive if superficial 19thand 20th century modernisations. No carpentry detail is exposed in No. 2 and both main fireplaces are-blocked by 20th century grates. The main room in No. 1 does show a 17th century soffit-chamfered and scroll-stopped crossbeam. Roof not accessible but the bottom principals of probably 17th century A-frame trusses show on the first floor.

The little cottage that stood opposite does not appear to have had any very memorable name, other than St Cherries Cottage or Lower St Cherries. It and the field behind it belonged to the Church. It was sold sometime in the early 20th century, first to the Hamlyns of Barton and then in the 1930s to William Powlesland, who was extremely fond of his cider and planted an orchard in the field behind. It was a tiny cob and thatch cottage, with one room and a scullery below and two bedrooms above. One of William’s children, who was a poultry farmer, used the cottage to put his incubators in, and the house was gradually left to decay.

A similar fate befell Little Silver, just south of St Cherries. It belonged to the Lamberts who used it to house a farm labourer. But it too deteriorated (if thatch is not kept up, the consequences are felt only too soon) and was condemned and then pulled down around the 1950s.

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CENSUS RETURNS FOR FALKEDON AND ST CHERRIES

1841 census

St Cherries

William Vigers, age 72,blacksmith, and family

New building

Samuel Vigers, age 27, tailor

Mary Vigers, age 20

William Cork, age apprentice

St Cherries

John Waye, age 55, thatcher

Jane Waye, age 50

Lucy Waye, age 20

Elizabeth Vigers, age 12

John Hill, age 11

Falkedon

John Kelland, age 38, farmer

Elizabeth Kelland, age 35

Elizabeth Kelland, age 10

Matilda Kelland, age 8

Frances Kelland, age 7

Mary Kelland, age 4

John Kelland, age 3

Sarah Scott, age 27, governess

Fanny Stone, age 18

Elizabeth Smale, age 15, apprentice

Mary Jenkins, age 13, apprentice

William White, age 19, apprentice

John Setter, age 16, apprentice

William Odes, age 13, apprentice

Emmanuel Odes, age 7, apprentice

William Counter, age 13, agricultural labourer

St Cherries Cottage [this presumably either the little cottage on the corner of Water Lane or Little Silver]

George Anstey, age 38, agricultural labourer

Elizabeth Anstey, age 40

Phebe Anstey, age 7

Grace Anstey, age 5

Lower Falkedon [this may be Falkedon Cottages]

Richard Stentiford, age 46, agricultural labourer

Grace Stentiford, age 40

Mary Stentiford, age 14

Richard Stentiford, age 9

Elizabeth Stentiford, age 5

William Stentiford, age 3

Samuel Heard, age 43, agricultural labourer

Grace Heard, age 42

Mary Stentiford, age 12

George Woodley, age 56, agricultural labourer

Mary Woodley, age 58

1851 census

Falkadon

Samuel Powlesland, age 53, farmer of 275 acres, employing 3 labourers

Jane (wife)

Samuel (son)

Rhoda Sampson, age 14, house servant

Maria Harvey, age 10, house servant

James Clarke, age 18, farm servant

John Webber, age 18, farm servant

Robert Curson, age 16, farm servant

Cann’s Falkadon

Richard Stentiford, agricultural labourer and wife Grace, son William and lodger William Smale

John Coombe, age 39, agricultural labourer, with wife Jane and son John

Lower Falkadon

Samuel Heard, age 52, agricultural labourer, and wife Grace

St Cherries

John Waye, age 66, thatcher, with wife Jane and grandchildren Elizabeth (surname illegible] and John Hill, thatcher

Little Silver

John Vanstone, age 24, agricultural labouer, and wife Ann

1861 census

Falkadon

Samuel Powlesland, age 63, widower, farmer of 460 acres, employing 5 labourers

John Powlesland (married son), age 40

Mirriam Powlesland (son’s wife), age 38

Their daughters Lucy and Susan

Mary Osborn, age 21, house servant

Elizabeth Hill, age 12, dairy maid

John Yeo, age 18, apprentice agricultural labourer

James Tucket, age 18, carter

William Tucket, age 14, carter

John Combe, age 13, servant

John Wonnacott, age 13, servant

Falkadon Cottage 1

Thomas Savin, age 38, agricuktural labourer, with wife Ann and children William and Maria

Falkadon Cottage 2

John Combe, age, agricultural labourer; wife Jane; daughter Elizabeth and son William who is visiting – he is aged 22 and a gentleman’s servant.

Falkadon Cottage 3

Richard Stentaford, age 66, agricultural labourer, with his wife Grace

Little Silver

John Stentaford, age 30, agricultural labourer, with wife Hannah; son Richard; and lodger William Arscott age 56, unmarried agricultural labourer.

St Cherries

William Gribble, age 33,agricultural labourer, with wife Elizabeth and children John, Elizabeth and William

John Waye, age 75, thatcher, and wife Jane

Lower Falkedon [probably the farmyard just north of Falkedon that has now disappeared]

John Manning, age 30, agricultural labourer, with wife Mary, daughter Susan and unmarried lodger William Powlesland, age 62, agricultural labourer

1871 census

Falkadon

Samuel Jackman, age 58, farming 220 acres and employing 1 labourer

Mary (wife), age 48

Sons John, Samuel and William, ages 24, 20 and 17

Daughters Elizabeth, Ellen, Jessie, Anne, age 22, 13, 8 and 3

Sophia Seward, age 12, general servant

Samuel Arscott, age 19, farm servant, living in

Henry Easterbrook, farm servant, living in

Falkadon Cottages

Thomas Savin age 46, agricultural labourer, wife Ann and daughters Maria, Ann, Lucy

John Coombe, age 60, agricultural labourer; wife Jane; unmarried son John (a tailor) and daughter Elizabeth

James Drew, age 50, agricultural labourer; wife Eliza; son and daughter and 2 boarders

Little Silver

William Webber, age 34, agricultural labourer; wife Jane; 2 sons and 2 daughters

Mount Pleasant

Presumably another cottage that has disappeared, or possibly another name for the cottage across the road from St Cherries

Eliza Wadman, age 49, widow, charwoman

William Wadman (son) age 22 and his wife

Mary Moor (daughter) and her husband William;

4 “visitors”

Lower Falkadon

It is not clear which of the two Lower Falkedons this is, but probably the one near the main Falkedon farmhouse.

Thomas Seaward, age 50, agricultural labourer; wife Betsy, daughter Emma and son William

St Cherries

William Beer, age 25, agricultural labourer; wife Harriet, daughters Elizabeth and Rhoda

John Manning, age 40, agricultural labourer; wife Mary; daughters susanna and Mary Ann; sons John and George

1881 Census

Falkadon

Thomas Howard, age 37, farmer of 216 acres, employing 3 labourers and 1 boy

Mary (wife), age 39

Sons William, and Thomas and daughters Mary and Susan

Thomas Howard, widower age 71, retired farmer

Mary Wonnacott, age 19, general servant

Samuel Jolley, age 21, farm servant, living in.

Robert Jolley, age 23, farm servant, living in.

Falkadon Cottages

Robert Yeo, age 49, agricultural labourer

Ruth (wife), age 37; 2 sons and 3 daughters

William Wonnacott, age 64, agricultural labourer

Jane (wife) and daughter Elizabeth (servant)

James Coombe, age 30, agricultural labourer

Alice (wife), age 31; 1 son, 3 daughters

Little Silver

William Webber, age 44, agricultural labourer

Jane (wife); 1 daughter, 2 sons

St Cherries

Thomas Lee, age 34, agricultural labourer,

Eliza (wife); 1 son and 4 daughters

Anne Redstone (boarder), age 5

William Martin, age 38, widower, agricultural labourer

2 daughters

Mary Martin (mother), age 63, housekeeper

Falkadon Cottage

Presumably the small cottage on the other side of the road from St Cherries

Thomas Seaward, age 60, agricultural labourer, and wife.

1891 census

Falkadon (unspecified, so probably includes Falkedon Cottages plus Falkedon farm, which may have been given over to two families of labourers)

Samuel Adams, age 58, agricultural labourer

Caroline Adams, age 58

Son Richard, age 18, agricultural labourer; and daughter Catherine age 15

Widowed mother-in-law Mary Francis, age 92.

George Brooks, age 38, agricultural labourer

Eliza Brooks, age 40

Sons John and Fred aged 10 and 5 months; and daughters Jane, Mary, Jessie, Edith aged 11,8,5 and 2

William Jolley, boarder, aged 81, widower, retired labourer

John Kelly, age 40, boarder, agricultural labourer

John Tremblett (possibly a mistake for Tremlett), age 38, stone-breaker (for making roads)

Mary (wife), age 38, laundress

Sons William and Samuel, 10 and 2; daughter Mary, 3

James Webber, age 65, agricultural labourer

Priscilla (wife), age 70

Mary Howard, age 45 tailoress

Thomas Lee, age 40, agricultural labourer

Eliza (wife), age 43

Daughters Susan and Emma, ages 13 and 10.

Little Silver

William Wonnacott, age 33, agricultural labourer

Maria (wife), age 30

Daughters Elizabeth and Ethel, ages 5 and 3; and son Alfred William age 10 months

Lower Falkadon (this is probably either Falkedon or the farmhouse to the north that has disappeared, as Johns is recorded in the next census as promoted to hind or estate manager)

William Johns, age 54, agricultural labourer

Rebecca (wife), age 54

Daughter Emma, age 15

St Cherries

St Cherries was marked on the 1889 Ordnance Survey as a smithy, so the Washplants were presumably living in the present St Cherries or part of it. One of the other families may also have been living in St Cherries, and the other in the cottage across the road.

William Martin, age 49, agricultural labourer

Mary Martin (mother), widow, age 73

William Woodley, age 34, agricultural labourer

Charlotte (wife), age

Daughters Una and Florence, ages 13 and 6; and sons [illegible] and Edgar, ages 10 and 3

Lewis Washplant, age 26, blacksmith

Edith (wife) age 25

Daughters Edith and Mabel, aged 3 and 1

1901 census

Falkedon

William Johns, age 65, hind (i.e. bailiff or estate manage, probably working for George Lambert M.P.)

Rebecca Johns, age 55

The following families were probably at Falkedon cottages, working for the Battishill family.

Thomas Lee, age 59, labourer on farm

Eliza Lee, age 53

Daughter Susan, age 23 and grandson Sydney age 4

Mary ?Howard, age 56, tailoress

John Lee, age 55, general labourer

Susanna Lee, age 45

Daughters Maria, Emma, Elizabeth, Florence and Mabel and son Thomas.

Elizabeth Lee, widow, age 27, annuitant 9i.e. living on her own income, possibly a pension)

Sons William and John age 4 and 2, and daughter Emma age 1

St Cherries

No distinction is made in this census return between St Cherries and the two nearby cottages that have now disappeared.

William Woodley, age 46, farmer

Charlotte Woodley, age 43

Sons (name illegible) age 20, apprentice carpenter and Edgar, age 13

Daughters Blanche and Dorothy, ages 19 and 2 months

Mark Sanders, age 40, ordinary agricultural labourer

Susan Woodley, age 37

Sons William and Frank, ages 13 and 7

Daughter Emily, 9

Maria Wonnacott, age 40 (she is not widowed, so her husband, probably a farm labourer, was probably absent

Son Alfred age 10 and daughters Jessie and ?Elizabeth ages 7 and 4.

William Webber, age 64, ordinary farm labourer

Jane Webber, age 60

Son George, age 40, single, labourer on farm

1911 census

Falkedon Farm

George Sampson, age 40, farmer

Emily Sampson, age 35

Sons Gordon, John, Edgar and Horace Sampson, ages 7-14

Daughter Gladys Sampson, age 1

Grand-daughter Rose Sampson, aged 1 month

Annie Gillard, age 50, visitor

Elizabeth Lee, age 15, servant

Falkedon Cottages

John Lee, age 65, farm labourer

Susanna Lee, age 55

Son William Henry Lee, age 33, farm labourer

Daughters Maria (domestic servant), Florence Emily and Mabel, ages 23, 12 and 10

Grand-daughter Nora Cecelia Lee, age 6

Philip Brooks, age 54, farm labourer

Emma Brooks, age 58

Daughter Alice Brooks, age 15

John Lang, age 72, farm labourer

Elizabeth Lang, age 75

St Cherries

No distinction is made in this census return between St Cherries and the two nearby cottages that have now disappeared.

John Martin, age 46,farm labourer

Emma Martin, age 45

Daughters Ellen, Beatrice, Emily and May, ages 10,8,6,4.

Abraham Cann, age 33, farm labourer

Florence Cann, age 28

Daughters Lily and Eliza, ages 4 and 1

John Ware, age 57, farm labourer

Amy Jury, age 25, widowed daughter

Dorothy Jury, age 2

William Woodley, age 58, farming

Charlotte Woodley, age 57

Son Edgar Clark Woodley, age 22, farm labourer

Daughter Pearl Dorothy Woodley, age 10

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DEEDS RELATING TO FALKEDON IN THE PUBLIC ARCHIVES

Almost all the 17th and 18th century deeds come from George Lambert Gorwyn, who must have inherited them from his uncle George Cann along with the property. In those days, deeds, marriage settlements and wills showing previousproperty transactions were the only way of proving ownership.

Whenwere rented out, the normal term was 99 years or until the deaths of up to three people named in the lease (“the lives”), whichever was the soonest. Farmers would usually nominate their children. When properties were conveyed, it was normal to give the purchaser a one-year lease of the property at a nominal rent (“the lease”) on the day before the actual conveyance (“the release”), as by selling a property already leased to the purchaser one avoided paying a registration fee.

Inquisition post-mortem of Margaret, widow of Hugh de Courtenay, 1391/2.

Margaret, widow of Hugh de Courtenay, earl of Devon, held among many other properties, Folketon, Broadnymet and Appledore, for 1 knight’s fee. They were held by Robert de Broadnymet.

National Archives C136/70/1.

List of rents due in the manor of Spreyton in 1664.Includes 11 people paying rent at Falkedon.

Devon Record Office ref:158M/M42

Lease and release of 26 and 27.4.1675 (27 Charles II).The first is a lease for 1 year from for 5s.and a rent of 2d. granted by Andrew Puddicombe of Hitisley, yeoman, to Mary Battishill of Drewsteignton of half of all those messuages and lands known as Higher Falkedon; half a field part of Churchwoodland; and a half share of a house, garden and 2 little quilletts of land in Falkedon (normally let with the aforesaid messuages etc), all currently in the tenure of Mary Battishill, Hillary Langford and John Taylor. The purpose of the lease is to allow the conveyance of the premises.In the second deed, Andrew Puddicombe conveys the same properties to Mary Battishill of Drewsteignton, widow, for £108. It mentions:

a lease of 27.10.1642 (17 Charles I) for 99 years made and granted by William Battishill to Andrew Battishill, determinable on the deaths of Andrew, Thomas and William Battishill.

Signed Andrew Puddicombe; witnesses: Nathaniel Risdon senior, Philip Furse, Nathaniel Risdon junior and Thomas Northmore.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 3.5 and 24.6.1678 (29 Charles II). The first document is a 1-year lease for 10s to allow for the conveyance of the properties. In the second, Mary Battishill, widow of Teignton Drew, conveys to John Battishill of Spreyton, bachelor, for £52.10s. a fourth part of all the messuages and lands called Higher Falkedon and a fourth part of a field, part of Churchwoodland, all of which were in the occupation of Mary or her tenants; and the fourth part of a house and garden and two little quilletts of ground, that were part of Lower Falkedon and previously granted with it, and in the possession of Mary Battishill, Hillary Langford and John Taylor.

Signed: Mary Battishill (with a mark). Witnesses: Thomas Battishill, ? Northmore and Richard Hutton.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Assignment of lease of 13.3.1688/9 (1 William and Mary) whereby Alexander Aish of Throwley, yeoman, transfers for £82 to Jane Battishill of Drewsteignton, widow, the residue of his lease of a fourth part of Lower Falkedon and a fourth part of 2 closes of land, part of Churchwoodland, effective from 25 March. It notes that

John Kelly of Kelly, Esq. by deed of 8.10.1672 (24 Charles II) leased to Elizabeth Cann of Spreyton, spinster, daughter of Richard Cann deceased, his fourth part of Lower Falkedon and a fourth part of 2 closes of land, part of Churchwoodland and of a certain tenement in Lower Falkedon, and late in the tenure of Richard Cann, for 99 years determinable on the deaths of Elizabeth Cann, Elizabeth Pounsford (wife of William Pounsford and her mother) and Alexander Cann, son of Alexander Cann then of Spreyton (since deceased), at a yearly rent of 3s.4d. Elizabeth Cann then married Alexander Aish, who thus now holds the lease and is thus entitled to transfer it.

Signed Alexander Aysh; witnesses Will. Pounsford, William Ponsford, John ?Druse.

A further deed dated 30.4.1694 (6 William and Mary) endorsed on the document records that Jane Battishill for £82 transferred the lease on that date to her son Andrew Battishill.

Signed Jane Battishill. Witnesses: William Ponsford, James Battishill.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 15 and 16.5.1696 (8 William III). Thomas Hore and Andrew Battishill the Elder (both yeomen of Spreyton) give a one-year lease and then convey to Andrew Battishill the Younger of Spreyton one fourth of all those messuages known as Higher Falkedon and a fourth of one close of land and appurtenances, part of Churchwoodland, and a fourth of one house and garden with two quilletts of land with appurtenances lying in Falkedon, all now or late in the possession of Andrew Battishill the Elder or his tenant. Andrew the Younger pays £80 (and 5s for the lease). Andrew Battishill the Elder and Thomasin his wife give undertakings on producing documents.

Signed Thomas Hore and Andrew Battishill; witnesses: William Ponsford, Robert Hore and Marke Cann.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Marriage settlement of 10.5.1699 (11 William III) between (1) Andrew Battishill, yeoman of Spreyton; and (2) William Battishill, yeoman of Spreyton, Thomas Hore the Younger of South Tawton and Barbara Hore, his sister (whom Andrew is about to marry). Half of Lower Falkedon and a quarter of Higher Falkedon, of which Andrew is seized in fee simple, are conveyed by Andrew to William Battishill and Thomas Hore on trust, against payment of £100 by Thomas Hore the Elder of South Tawton, father of Barbara. Under the trust, the properties (in the case of the fourth of Higher Falkedon insofar as other uses have not been declared) are settled on Andrew for his life; then Barbara for life; and then on their sons, and in default on their daughters, and in default of any children on Andrew’s right heirs [his legal heirs]. Provisions are also made for the payment of marriage portions to any daughters and for provision for younger sons. A one-year lease of the property for 5s had been granted to William Battishill and Thomas Hore on 25.3.1699 in anticipation of the conveyance.

Signed: Will. Battishill, Thomas Hore and Barbara Hore (sign). Witnesses:William Ponsford,? Cann (sign) and Mary Hore (sign). See also the agreement of 8.12.1707 between William and Andrew Battishill resettling parts of Falkedon and Spreyton Barton.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Agreement of 8.12.1707 between William Battishill, yeoman, and Andrew Battishill, yeoman, both of Spreyton. It is noted that William and Andrew levied a fine in Easter term 13 William III (1702) [a way of legalising the transfer of property] of a half of 3 messuages [dwellings], 3 gardens, 3 orchards, 40 acres of land, 8 acres of meadow, 40 acres of pasture,160 acres of furze and heath, and 170 acres of moor [total 418 acres], in Barton, Higher Fawton and Lower Fawton, in favour of Thomas Hore junior and William Ponsford.. It is agreed that the intention of the fine is for:

the half of Spreyton Barton to go to William for life; then his wife Jane (formerly Hore) for life; then first to the male heirs and then to the female heirs of William and Jane and in default to William’s general heirs and assignees;

the half of Higher Fawton, wherein the uses have been declared to be for William for life, after his death first to his male and then to his female heirs, and in default his right heirs.

the half of Lower Fawton is to go to William for life and then to the male heirs of him and Jane, and in default to the female heirs and then the general heirs, subject to an indenture of 18.5.(8 William III) between William Battishill and William Pounsford of Drewsteignton, Mark Cann and Thomas Hore the younger of South Tawton and Jane, the daughter of Thomas Hore the elder of South Tawton, yeoman;

the half of Lower Fawton to Andrew Battishill for life; then to his wife Barbara for life; then their heirs male and in defaulttheir female heirs and then Andrew’s general heirs;

a quarter of Higher Fawton  to go to Andrew for life, then to his male heirs by Barbara and in default his female heirs, then general heirs [the wording suggests that whereas the properties subject the fine were freehold, this may be a leasehold].

Counterpart signed by William Battishill. Witnesses: Ben Robins, Daniel Dingle.

Lease of 15.6.1715 (1 George I).Richard Risdon of Spraiton gent. leases to Andrew Battishill, yeoman, a fourth part of Lesser Falkedon and his fourth part of the two fields known as Churchwoodland, both part of the Manor of Spraiton and now in the tenure of Andrew or his assignees. The lease is for 99 years determinable on the deaths of William and Thomas Battishill, sons of Andrew, and of Barbara his wife, for an upfront payment of £85.10s and at a yearly rent of 3s.4d. and 2 capons or 2s. at Christmas, with a heriot of ¼ of the best beast or £1. Andrew must do suit and service at the courts of Richard Risdon in the Manor of Spraiton. Andrew can have timber from the property for repairs, firewood etc.

Witnesses: Thomas Hore, Will. Battishill and ?B Eastabrooke.Both counterparts survive. Judging by a note on the back of the counterpart signed by Richard Risdon, there were mortgages on the property and part of the purchase price was paid by others. Counterpart signed by AB retained.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Agreement of28.7.1719 (5 George I) between Andrew Battishill of Spreyton yeoman and Thomas Hore of South Tawton. It refers to an agreement of a date long past between Andrew Battishill and his brother William whereby Andrew deposited £400 with William until Andrew should purchase an estate of £100 or more for the better maintenance of his wife Barbara, to be conveyed to Thomas Hore in trust for Barbara. In pursuance of this agreement, on 14 June of 1 George I (probably a mistake for 15 June – see above), Andrew took a lease from Richard Risdon of Spreyton ofone quarter of Lesser Falkedon and one quarter of the two fields known as Churchwoodland, then and now in the tenure of Andrew. The lease was for 99 years determinable on the deaths of Andrew’s sons William and Thomas and of Barbara. Andrew now conveys the residue of the lease to Thomas Hore in trust with effect from the previous 24 June, the rents and profits to accrue to Andrew for his life, then Barbara for her life and afterwards to such children of them both as Andrew may appoint in his will, or in default of a will equally between Andrew’s and Barbara’s children both male and female. The beneficiaries rather than Thomas Hore are to be responsible for the outgoings.

Counterpart signed by Thomas Hore; witnesses: John Burgoyne and John Battishill.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 24 and 25.6.1730 (4 George II).The parties are (1) Andrew Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman; (2) Thomas Battishill, yeoman, eldest son and heir apparent of Andrew; (3) William Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman; James Battishill of South Tawton, yeoman; and Edward May of Chagford, yeoman; and (4) Elizabeth the wife of Thomas and daughter of Edward May. There is the usual one-year lease for 5s and a peppercorn rent to prepare for the release. In consideration of Thomas’s recent marriage to Elizabeth; £200 paid by Thomas to Andrew; £100 paid by Edward May to Thomas as a marriage portion for Elizabeth; for making a sufficient jointure for Elizabeth if she survives her husband; and to confirm the jointure already made for Andrew’s wife Barbara at the time of their marriage; a number of property arrangements are made. Andrew and Thomas have conveyed to William and James Battishill and Edward May on trust a
half of Lower Falkedon and one fourth of Higher Falkedon, both now or late in the possession of Andrew or his under-tenants. Under the trust, Andrew is to have an annuity of £10 for 80 years if he should live that long from the half of Lower Falkedon; subject to that, the use of the property goes to Thomas and his heirs by Elizabeth, and for want of such heirs to Andrew during the life of Andrew, and after Andrew’s death the use of the property reverts to Barbara, Andrew’s wife, for her life, as it was part of her marriage settlement.

After Barbara’s death it goes to Thomas and after him to Elizabeth and then to their children, or if there are no such children to Thomas’s heirs. The quarter of Higher Falkedon goes to Thomas for life, and then Elizabeth as her jointure and then their children. Andrew and Thomas undertake to levy a fine on the premises before the next Michaelmas Term in favour of William and James Battishill and Edward May. Lower Falkedon is described as 1 messuage, 1 garden, 1 orchard, 30 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow, and 40 acres of furze and heath. Higher Falkedon is described as 1 messuage, 1 garden, 2 orchards, 20 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow and 40 of furze and heath.

It is noted that Andrew has a further fourth of Lower Falkedon on a 99-year lease determinable on the death of Thomas, his brother William and Barbara; and the last fourth on a 99-year lease determinable on the deaths of Elizabeth Aish of Throwley, widow (née Cann); and Alexander Cann of Drewsteignton, yeoman, by virtue of:

a 99-year lease of one quarter of Lower Falkedon dated 8.10.1684 (24 Charles II) between John Kelly of Kelly and Elizabeth Cann (subsequently Aish), then spinster daughter of Richard Cann deceased, at a yearlyrent of 3s.4d. [see above]; and

a deed of assignment of 13.3.1689 (1 William and Mary) made by Alexander Aish, the deceased husband of Elizabeth Aish, to Jane Battishill of Drewsteignton, widow (since deceased);

a deed of assignment of 30.4.1695 (6 William and Mary) made by Jane Battishill to Andrew Battishill;

a lease of 6.12.1714/5 (1 George I) of Higher Falkedon granted by Richard Risdon of Spreyton, gent. (since deceased) to Andrew at an annual rent of 2s.

It is also noted that Andrew is possessed of a 99-year lease of one fourth of Higher Falkedon determinable on the deaths of Thomas and Andrew (another son of Andrew), by virtue of an indenture dated 6.12 1715 (1 Geo I) between Richard Risdon of Spreyton, gent., since deceased, and Andrew at an annual rent of 2s.

It is also noted that Andrew has a lease of another eighth part of Higher Falkedon for 99 years determinable on the death of John Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman, by virtue of a lease.

For 5s. paid by William and James Battishill and Edward, Andrew transfers to them these leasehold premises for the residue of the 99-year terms, in trust. Under the trust, Thomas can enjoy the revenues of the two fourths of Lower Falkedon during the life of Andrew (if the leases do not expire beforehand), but subject to 2 annuities of £5 to be paid to Andrew out of each of the 2 leasehold quarters of Lower Falkedon. If Barbara survives Andrew, she gets the revenues of the leasehold premises for her life, as was agreed in her marriage settlement; and shall also have the use of the parlour and parlour chamber in Higher Falkedon for life, so long as she does not remarry and also allows Thomas the use of the half and two quarter parts of Lower Falkedon. After her death, Thomas gets the revenues from the 2 fourth parts of Lower Falkedon and also from the fourth and eighth parts of Higher Falkedon. After his death, Elizabeth gets the revenue from the fourth and eighth parts of Higher Falkedon, and on her death they go to Thomas’s executors. Thomas also undertakes to take new 99-year leases of the 2 quarters of Lower Falkedon, the quarter and eighth of Higher Falkedon and another eighth held by John Battishill determinable on his life, so as to provide for Elizabeth if she is widowed. The new leases are to be to Thomas or Andrew and determinable on the life of Elizabeth or Elizabeth and some other person or persons.

Witnessed by J. Whitefield, Mary Whitefield and E. Whitefield. An endorsement on the back notes that Andrew can only pay £120 of the £200 immediately and will pay the remaining £80 later.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease of 12.4.1735 whereby Barbara Battishill of Spreyton, widow, leases Lower Falkedon to her son Thomas Battishill, yeoman for a yearly rent of £20. She reserves for herself the house in which Richard Diment now lives, together with its orchard and garden. The lease is for 40 years determinable on Barbara’s death, effective from the previous 25 March. There are instructions as to the cultivation of the land. Thomas covenants not to break plough and till any of the ground that has previously been tilled without bestowing on every acre 10 hogsheads of good lime or 200 seams or horseloads of good black rotten dung, according to the best rules of husbandry, and for every such dressing to take no more than three crops of corn or grain, the last to be barley or oats). There is a proviso that if the right that Barbara has to one quarter part of the premises, belonging to Arthur Kelly of Kelly Esq., expires before the end of the term of Thomas’s lease, Barbara will allow a £5 rebate on the annual rent.

Signed: Barbara Battishill (with a mark). Witnesses: William Battishill and James Hunt.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Agreement in Court of ?1735 (15 days after Easter in 9 Geo II) between Nathaniel Risdon Gent., plaintiff, and Thomas Battishill and his wife Elizabeth, defendants, concerning a half of Lower Falkedon (1 house, 1 garden, 1 orchard, 30 acres of land,3 acres of meadow and 40 acres of furze and heath) and a fourth part of Higher Falkedon (1 house, 1 garden, 2 orchards, 20 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow and 40 of furze and heath). Thomas and Elizabeth acknowledge Nathaniel’s right to the properties. Nathaniel has paid £60 to the Battishills.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 25. and 26.6.1735 (9 Geo II).John Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman, gives Nathaniel Risdon of Spreyton, gent., a one-year lease of one fourth of a messuage and tenement or certain messuages and tenements called Higher Falkedon, one fourth of a field, part of Churchwoodland, and one fourth of a house and garden and two little quilletts of ground or orchards, part of the said messuage or messuages, now or late in the tenure or occupation of John Battishill or assignees or undertenants. There is an upfront payment of 5s and a peppercorn rent. The properties are then conveyed to Nathaniel for £87.10s.

Signed John Battishill. Witnesses: Edwd Pethybridge, J Whitefield, John Whitefield junior.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 7 and 8.3.1736 (10 George II). In the first document Barbara and Thomas Battishill grant a 1-year lease to Edward Fox for 5s. and a peppercorn rent. The second indenture is between (1) Barbara Battishill of Spreyton, widow, and Andrew Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman;(2) Edward Fox of Lyons Inn, London, gent.; and (3) Simon Pincombe of St Thomas the Apostle, scrivener. In order to bar the entail on a half share of Lower Falkedon (late in the tenure of Andrew Battishill deceased, the husband of Barbara, and now in that of Thomas as tenant to Barbara), Barbara and Thomas Battishill convey the property to Edward Fox for 5s. It is agreed between the parties that a common recovery will be executed, with a writ of entry being brought by Simon Pincombe as demandant against Edward Fox, with Edward Fox and Thomas appearing as vouchers. The parties also agree that once the exercise is completed, the property will be for the use of Barbara for her life, after the death of Barbara, for the use of Thomas Battishill and his heirs, with the exception of the half share in a cottage and garden belonging to the property and occupied by Richard Dymond, which shall be for the use of Thomas for his life and after his death and that of Barbara, for that of Elizabeth, wife of Thomas, for her life and then Thomas’s heirs. There is also an annuity of £8, payable to Elizabeth for life if she should be widowed, which is charged on Lower Falkedon by an indenture of 25.6.1736 between (1) Thomas and Elizabeth Battishill and (2) Nathaniel Risdon of Spreyton, gent.

Counterpart signed by Barbara (mark) and Thomas Battishill; witnesses: Christopher Coplestone, Elizabeth Willcox, Benj. Wood and Humphrey Finimore.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Tripartite indenture of 8.3.1736 between (1) Barbara Battishill of Spreyton, widow, and Thomas Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman; (2) Edward Fox of Lyons Inn, London, gent; and (3) Simon Pinscombe of St Thomas the Apostle in Devon, scrivenor. The deed is for docking and barring all estates tail in half of Lower Falkedon, late in the tenure of Andrew Battishill, deceased husband of Barbara, and now in that of Thomas as tenant to Barbara, and settling the property. Edward Fox pays 5s to Barbara and Thomas. They release the property to him (he having taken a one-year lease the day before). So that Edward Fox may be a perfect tenant of the freehold, it is agreed that a common recovery should be executed at the cost of Thomas, and to that end one writ of entry may be brought in the name of Simon Pinscombe as demandant against Edward Fox as tenant of the property. Edward Fox will appear gratis in his proper person and vouch to warrant the premises. Thomas will appear in his proper person or by attorney and enter into warranty and vouch the common voucheee and such other proceedings shall be had therein that a good perfect common recovery with dopuble vouchee may be prosecuted and executed etc. And it is further agreed that the intent is for the property to be for the use of Barbara for her lifetime and after her decease. As for halfone cottage and garden in the possession of Richard Dymond as under-tenant, part of the property, for the use of Thomas during his life and after his death and Barbara’s to Elizabeth for her life and then Thomas’s heirs.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Agreement of 27.4.1736 (10 Geo II) between (1) Thomas Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman, and his wife Elizabeth; (2) Richard Lymbry of Clements Inn, Middlesex, gent.; and (3) Simon Pincombe late of St Thomas the Apostle and now of Exeter, scrivener. In order to bar the entail on one half of Lower Falkedon (late in the possession of Andrew Battishill, Thomas’s late father, and now in the possession of Thomas), Thomas and Eliz. Battishill undertake to levy a fine in favour of Richard Lymbery, to the intent that RL shall be tenant of the freehold until common recovery can be had, to which end a writ shall be had in the name of Simon Pincombe. The property is to be held in trust to be assigned to such person as Thomas may direct for a term of 500 years, to act as security for a loan. At the end or determination of the term, the property reverts to Thomas for life. After the determination of the term and Thomas’s death,half of a cottage and garden, part of the property and now in the possession of Richard Dymond, is for the use of Elizabeth Battishill for life and after her death to the use of Thomas’s heirs. There is also a provision for a £8 annuity for Elizabeth if she survives her husband, secured on the rest of the property, which subject to that goes to his heirs.

Signed Thomas Battishill, Elizabeth Battishill, Simon Pincombe. Witnesses are Jos. Butler, Thos ?Rowe..

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Mortgage of 29.4.1736 (10 George II).Thomas Battishill of Spreyton mortgages to John Cholwich of Exeter, Esq., ¼ of Lower Falkedon (late in the possession of Andrew, Thomas’s father and then of Thomas himself) for the residue of a 99 year lease to him determinable on Thomas’s death and that of his brother William); and another ¼ of Lower Falkedon (for the residue of another 99-year lease to him determinable on the deaths of Elizabeth Aish of Throwley, widow, and Alexander Cann of Drewsteignton, yeoman). TB also conveys the other half of Lower Falkedon (by virtue of the power given him in a tripartite indenture of 27 April) to John Cholwich for a term of 500 years and an annual rent of a corn of wheat. The property is security for a loan of£150 due on the following 29 October. It is noted that Battishill has also entered into a penal bond to Cholwich in the sum of £300 as further security for the payment. Thomas Battishill also undertakes to purchase new 99-year leases on the two quarters as necessary so that there are always three lives determining them.

Signed Thomas Battishill; witnesses William Bronn, Simon Pincombe.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Judgement of 23.5.1736 (10 George II). Simon Pincombe claims half of Lower Falkedon from Edward Fox gent. and is granted it. The property claimed is described as a half of one messuage, 2 gardens, 30 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow and 40 acres of furze and heath.

.(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 24 and 25.6.1736. Thomas and Elizabeth Battishill convey to Nathaniel Risdon for £85 one quarter of Higher Falkedon and of a field of Churchwoodland belonging to it, now or late in the tenure of Thomas or his tenants. Thomas Battishill declares himself to be seized in fee simple of the premises. The deed of release refers to the fine levied on the premises by Thomas and Nathaniel (see above) in favour of Nathaniel, and 
all the parties agree that the intention of the parties in relation to the fine in respect of the quarter of Higher Falkedon is that these premises should be for the use of Nathaniel and his heirs forever. The lease is for the usual one year at a rent of one barley corn.

Signed by all three parties; witnesses: John Battishill, Edward May and E. Whitefield.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Transfer of lease of 25.6.1736 (10 George II) between (1) Thomas and Elizabeth Battishill and Edward May of Chagford, yeoman; and (2) Nathaniel Risdon of Spreyton, gent., son and heir of Richard Risdon of Spreyton, gent. deceased. Thomas Battishill, his wife Elizabeth and her father Edward May transfer the residue of a 99-year lease on a quarter of Higher Falkedon to Nathaniel Risdon for £50 paid to Thomas Battishill and 5s paid to Edward May, and in consideration of the fact that Thomas has settled on Elizabeth a cottage belonging to Lower Falkedon and annuity of £8 chargeable upon Lower Falkedon for her life, as recompense for her giving up her interest in Higher Falkedon which came to her under her marriage settlement. The document refers to:

a lease of 6.12.1714 (1 George I) of a quarter of Higher Falkedon and a quarter of Churchwoodland with appurtenances usually let with Higher Falkedon, both late in the tenure of Andrew, granted by Richard Risdon to Andrew Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman, father of Thomas now also deceased, for 99 years determinable on the death of Andrew’s sons Thomas and Andrew, at a yearly rent of 2s., the term to begin after the death of Frances Marshall, wife of Philip Marshall then of Crediton, gent. It is noted that Frances Marshall is long since dead and the lease is now vested in Thomas.

Counterpart signed by Thomas, Elizabeth and Edward. Witnesses: John Battishill, E Whitefield.

[As Nathaniel is the heir of Richard who granted the lease, he presumably owns the reversion. ]

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease of 1736.
NathanielRisdon leases to Benedict Nethercott of Spreyton, husbandman,for 99 years, ¼ ofSt Cherries; ¼ of Little Brendon , a plot of ground being part of the estate called Higher Falkedon, for an upfront payment of 50s up front, determinable on three lives.

Devon Record Office ref: 897/T30

Agreement of 25.6.1736 (10 George II) between (1) Thomas and Elizabeth Battishill and (2) Nathaniel Risdon of Spreyton. It notes that Thomas and Elizabeth, in the last Easter Term levied unto Nathaniel Risdon a fine of a half of Lower Falkedon (described as 1 messuage, 1 garden, 1 orchard, 30 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow and 40 of furze and heath) and a quarter of Higher Falkedon (described as 1 messuage, 1 garden, 2 orchards, 20 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow and 40 acres of furze and heath), and that by joining in the fine Elizabeth barred herself of her jointure interest in the quarter of Higher Falkedon.She also joined Thomas in the transfer of another quarter of Higher Falkedon to Nathaniel for the remainder of a 99-year lease (determinable on the deaths of Thomas and his brother Andrew), in lieu of which Thomas has agreed to grant to Elizabeth a cottage and garden in Lower Falkedon for life and an annuity of £8. The agreement then resettles the various bits of land as follows:

the half of Lower Falkedon, now in the possession of Thomas as tenant to his widowed mother Barbara, who has a life interest (which is confirmed), goes after her death to Thomas for life;

after the deaths of Barbara and Thomas, half of a cottage and garden, part of Lower Falkedon, now in the tenancy of Richard Deymond, goes to Elizabeth for her life; and after her death it goes to such person as Thomas may nominate or to his heirs, for ever;

after the deaths of Barbara and Thomas,an annuity of £8 goes to Elizabeth, chargeable on the half of Lower Falkedon (except the cottage);

the quarter of Higher Falkedon has been conveyed by Thomas and Elizabeth to Nathaniel Risdon by an indenture of release on the same day as this document.

Thomas Battishill covenants on behalf of his heirs with Nathaniel that after his decease and that of Barbara, they will allow Elizabeth to enjoy the other half of the cottage for 60 years determinable on her death, without let or hindrance;

the cottage and annuity are accepted by all as being in lieu of all dower claims that she might otherwise have in the two quarters of Higher Falkedon, and also as in discharge of the obligation on Thomas in their marriage settlement to take a lease on part of Higher Falkedon, determinable on the death of Elizabeth, to be assigned in trust for her.

Signed by Thomas and Elizabeth Battishill and Nathaniel Risdon. Witnesses: John Battishill; Edward May; E. Whitefield.2 copies.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease of 20.4.1737 (11 George II)Nathaniel Risdon of Spreyton, gent., leases to John Cann of Spreyton, gent. for £140 Higher Falkingdon [from the wording of the rest of the document it seems that only ¾ of Higher Falkedon is being leased] and three quarters of Churchwoodland, premises at that time in the possession of John Cann. The timber is reserved as are Nathaniel Risdon’s rights to hunt on the premises without doing damage or waste. The lease is for 99 years starting from the previous 25 March, determinable on the deaths of John Cann’s 3 sons William, Mark and George. The annual rent is 9s and 2 capons or 1/6d at Christmas, and there is an obligation to do suit yearly to all Nathaniel Risdon’s courts within the Manor of Spreyton (or in default to pay sixpence), and to execute the office of tythingman as often as it shall come to be the tenant’s turn according to the custom and usage of the Manor. There is also a heriot due on the deaths of the 3 sons of £1.4s or three quarters of a best beast. The tenant is exonerated from all high and quit rents except a yearly high rent of 2d payable out of Churchwoodland.

Signed John Cann and N. Risdon. Witnesses: illegible..

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

3.20.Lease of 28.7.1739 (13.George II).William Battishill grants to John Cann, both yeomen of Spreyton, one barn and stable or shippen with the linhays and curtilage adjoining, all on the north-east side ofMiddle Falkedon, and also 2 fields known as the Plaistery and the Cole Garden. All the premises are part of Higher Falkedon and are in the possession of Thomas Smith of Spreyton. The timber rights are reserved to William Battishill and the Lords of the Fee. The lease of half the premises is for the residue of 2 existing leases:

  • lease of 27.7.1738 whereby Nathaniel Risdon of Spreyton, gent., leased his fourth part of Higher Falkedon to William Battishill for 99 years determinable on the deaths of William and his daughters Jane and Susanna Battishill, at a yearly rent of 10s.;
  • indenture of 18.7.1739 whereby Arthur Kelly of Kelly Esq. leased his fourth part of Higher Falkedon to William Battishill for 99 years determinable on the same lives at a yearly rent of 7s.4d

The lease of the other half of the premises is for 99 years, determinable on the lives of George, Willam and Mark Cann, sons of John. JC makes an upfront payment of £35 and the yearly rent is 2s.6d., with WB paying all high and chief rents and heriots in respect of the said half part of Higher Falkedon to Nathaniel Risdon and Arthur Kelly, as well as being responsible for church rates, poor rates and land tax.

Witnesses: James Rewe and Mark Cann. Both counterparts survive. The copy signed by John Cann is annotated to the effect that the high rent for the barn and house have been paid up to Lady Day 1759.

[The building isalmost certainly the barn or linhay on the other side of the road from Falkedon farmhouse, as the field behind is called Plaistery, and indicates that at that time Falkedon Cottages (now Cann’s Falkedon) was called Middle Falkedon.]

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Transfer of mortgage dated 19.10.1739 (13 George II).The parties are (1) John Cholwich Esq. of Exeter, (2)Thomas Battishill of Spreyton and (3) James White of Exeter, merchant. It notes that the £150 plus £12 interest due on the mortgage of29.4.1736 (10 George II) [see above] has not been paid. For a further £28 paid by James White to Thomas Battishill, and payment by James White of the £162 due to John Cholwich, the mortgaged premises (2 fourths of Lower Falkedon on 99-year leases and a half on a 500-year lease) are transferred to James White, with a promise from Thomas of repayment of the £190 now due plus interest by the following 19 April. The payment is further secured by Thomas Battishill entering into a penal bond of £380 to James White on the same day; and Thomas also undertakes to renew the two 99 year leases on two quarters of Lower Falkedon for further terms of 99 years determinable on new lives to improve the security for the loan.

Counterpart signed by John Cholwich and Thomas Battishill. Witnesses: Mary Pitfield, John Sargent.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease of 10.5.1742
(16 George II)whereby Arthur Kelly Esq. of Kelly leases to John Cann of Spreyton, yeoman, a fourth part of the one messuage of Middle Falkedon, formerly in the possession of Thomas Battishill and now in the possession of John Cann. The lease is for 99 years determinable on the lives of George, Mark and Willliam Cann, sons of John Cann. There is an upfront payment of £48 and an annual rent of £2, plus heriot of 13s 4d. The timber of oak, ash and elm is reserved. John Cann is required to keep the premises in adequate repair.

Both counterparts survive, signed respectivelyJohn Cann and Arthur Kelly. Witnesses: Sam. Harris and John Cann junior.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease of 29.9.1743 (17 George II)whereby Arthur Kelly Esq. of Kelly leases to John Cann of Spreyton, gent., his fourth part of Lower Falkedon and two fields of Churchwoodland which are part of a certain tenement in Lower Falkedon, late in the possession of Richard Cann. The lease is for 99 years determinable on the death of John’s son George Cann, and is to begin after the deaths of Alexander Cann of Drewsteignton and Elizabeth Ash of Throwley, widow, the only current lives on the property. The timber rights are reserved. There is an upfront payment of£25 and an annual rent of 3s.4d, with ¼ of the best beast or 13s.4d. as heriot. John Cann must do suit and service to the courts of Arthur Kelly which shall be held yearly within the Manor of Spreyton.

One counterpart signed by John Cann and witnessed by William Cann; the other signed by Arthur Kelly; witnesses James Harris, John Drake.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Mortgage agreement of 3.2.1743/4
(17 Geo II)betweenThomas Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman, and (2) James White, merchant, of Exeter. It refers to:

  • a tripartite indenture of 19.10.1739 (13 Geo II) between John Cholwich, Thomas Battishill and James White [see above] whereby John Cholwich by the direction of Thomas Battishill assigned to James White one fourth ofLower Falkedon, then in the possession of Thomas, and one other fourth of Lower Falkedon, and the other half; to hold one fourth for the residue of a term of 99 years then and now determinable on the deaths of Thomas and his brother William; another fourth for the remainder of another 99-year lease determinable on the deaths of Elizabeth Aysh and Alexander Cann; and the remaining half for the remainder of a 500-year term, redeemable on payment of £190 plus interest;
  • Thomas Battishill’s bond of 20.2. (14 Geo II) under which he became bound to James White in the penal sum of £60 for the payment of £30 on 20.5 (14 Geo II).

It is noted that Thomas is indebted to James White for £2.2s. endorsed on a promissory note given by Thomas to John Sargent on 6.8.1742. The parties agree that the various parts of Lower Falkedon will be security for the sums of £30 and £2.2s and interest, as well as for the £190 and interest.

Signed Thomas Battishill; witnesses Thomas ? and John Sargent.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 3 and 4.4.1744 (17 George II). In the first document Thomas Battishill grants a 1-year lease to John Sargent of half of Lower Falkedon, now in the possession of Thomas, for 5s. and a rent of a grain of wheat.The parties to the second indenture are (1) Thomas Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman; (2) John Sargent of Exeter. gent., and (3) James White of Exeter Esq. It notes that TB had mortgaged the various shares in Lower Falkedon to John Cholwich on 29.4.1737 for £150 (see above) and that James White had bought the mortgage for £162 and TB had assigned the premises to him against payment of a further £28, defeazable nevertheless on payment of £190. TB then incurred further debts to James White and cannot pay. The relevant parties therefore convey the residue of the leases on the premises to John Sargent so that he can sell them for the best price and repay TB’s debts. In the meantime the premises may be let for a term not exceeding 20 years at a rack or the best improved yearly rent. In addition, for better security for TB’s debts, TB conveys to John Sargent, also to be sold, 7 acres of wheat now growing at Lower Falkedon; and 5 acres of barley and 10 acres of oats which are to be sown forthwith, the ground already having been ploughed.

Signed Thomas Battishill. Witnesses: Mary Webber and John Sampson.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease of 27.5.1748 (22 George II) whereby James White of the City of London, Esq., leases Lower Falkedon to Thomas Smyth of Spreyton, husbandman, for 7 years (if James White’s interest in the premises lasts that long) at an annual rent of £20, but reserving the rights to the timber. There were various requirements as to the crops to be sown and the cultivation of the land (e.g. to dress each acre that is ploughed with ‘10 hogsheads of good hot well-burnt stone lime or 160 horseloads or seams of good black dung’; and to take no more than 3 crops after each dressing). Thomas Smyth was to pay the Church and Poor Rates and tithes and to perform parish duties; James White was to pay land tax and the high and chief rent. [Copy: no signature.]

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 7 and8.2.1750/1
(24 George II).In the first document, John Sargent and Thomas Battishill lease a half of Lower Falkedon, late in the occupation of Andrew Battishill deceased; then in that of Thomas his son (party hereto) and now in that of John Cann; to John Cann for 5s. and a peppercorn rent, as a preliminary to the conveyance of the premises to John Cann. The parties to the second indenture are (1) James White of Exeter, Esq.; (2) John Sargent of Exeter, gent.; (3) Thomas Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman, and his wife Elizabeth; (4) John Cann of Spreyton, gent.; and (5) John Gorwyn of Cheriton Bishop, yeoman. The first 3 parties convey the residue of two 99-year leases on two fourth parts of Lower Falkedon to John Cann for £270 paid to James White and 5s to John Sargent and Thos. Battishill. At the same time James White conveys to John Gorwyn for 5s. the residue of a 500-year lease of the other half of Lower Falkedon, to be held in trust for John Cann and to be disposed of as he directs and in the meantime to preserve it from all mesne encumbrance, and John Sargent on the direction of Thos. Battishill conveys the freehold to John Cann. Thosmas and Elizabeth also agree to levy a fine to establish John Cann’s ownership of the half share in the property, described as a half of a messuage, garden, orchard, 30 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow and 40 acres of furze and heath. The deed mentions:

a mortgage of 29.4.1737 taken out by Thomas Battishill on the property (see above);

indenture of19.10.1739 (13 Geo II) between John Cholwich Esq. of Exeter; Thomas Battishill; and James White of Exeter (described as a merchant) whereby John Cholwich and Thomas Battishill assigned the above mortgage and right to the property to James White for £162 (from James White) and £28 (from Thosmas Battishill);

indenture of 3.2.1743 between Thosmas Battishill and James. White whereby the premises were made security for further loans to Thomas Battishill;

indenture of 4.4.1743 (17 Geo II) Between Thomas Battishill, John Sargent and James White under which the premises were assigned to John Sargent to sell for the best price so as to raise the money to repay Battishill’s debts, by then totalling £249.16, and under which Battishill borrowed a further £10.4s. from Jas. White. It also mentions a 1-year lease of the previous day.

Signed John Sargent and Thomas Battishill; witnesses John Perry and Robert Parkin; ? and Thomas Mogridge.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Final Agreement of 2.2.?1751
(8th day of the Purification of the Blessed Mary in 24 George II) between John Cann plaintiff and Thomas Battishill and his wife Elizabeth. Thomas and Elizabeth acknowledge John’s right to a half of 1 messuage, 1 garden, 1 orchard, 30 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow and 40 acres of furze and heath in Lower Falkedon. John has paid £60 to Thomas and Elizabeth.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease of 20 June 1752 (26 George II) whereby Mary Risdon, mother and heir of the lands of Nathaniel Risdon of Crediton, deceased, leases to John Cann of Fuidge, gentleman, one fourth of Lower Falkedon, together with one fourth of two closes, part of Church Woodland, and all buildings etc., which were until then in the possession of Thomas Battishill. Mary Risdon reserves the timber rights for herself. The lease is for 99 years or the life of George Cann, son of John then aged about 20, the term to begin after the deaths ofWilliam and Thomas Battishill. JohnCann makes an upfront payment of £12; and there is an annual rent of 3s.4d. and a herriot payable on the death of George Cann of one fourth of the best beast of the then occupant or £1. John Cann undertakes to ‘perform suit of court unto all and every of the courts of Mary Risdon to be holden and kept for within her Manor of Spreyton there to be ordered and directed by the Steward of the said Manor for the time being touching the premises in such things as have been accustomed upon such reasonable notice as other tenants of the said Manor do or have been accustomed to do’.

Both counterparts survive, signed respectively Mary Risdon and John Cann; witnesses Grace ?Hite, Josias Salter.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Conveyance of 20.12.1757 whereby Richard Hole of North Tawton, Clerk, executor of the last will and testament of the late Mary Risdon of Spreyton, widow, his late aunt, and also devisee of the lands concerned, Mary Risdon having inherited them from her son Nathaniel Risdon, late of Crediton, gent. conveys to William Battishill of Spreyton, gent., for £300 his one fourth share in Spreyton Barton, now in the tenure of WB; one fourth of Great Falkedon, now in the tenure of William and his under-tenants Robert Kellaway and Richard Tremlet; one fourth of Middle Falkedon or South Falkedon or Cann’s Falkedon; one fourth of Stockon, aka Stockey, now in the possession of Samuel Bull as under-tenant to William Battishill;one fourth of the messuage and two Grist Mills known as Spreyton or Horracombe Mills now in the possession of Jeremiah Bickle as under-tenant to William Battishill; and Richard Hole’’s one fourth share in Begbeere, late in the possession of Christopher Parsons and now in that of Richard Hole. All the premises are part of the Manor of Spreyton, William Battishill ‘to be holden of the high and chief Lord or Lords of the Fee by the rents, suits and services heretofore due and of right accustomed’. Willam Battishill to pay a reserved rent to Richard Hole of 11s 6d for Spreyton Barton; 10s. for Great Falkedon; 10s. for Cann’s or Middle Falkedon and Church Woodland; 2s.6d. for Spreyton Mills; 2s. 6d. for Stockey; and 3s. for Begbeer. Witnesses are Humphry Aram and Richard Dadd. Previous deeds mentioned are:

  • Lease of 29.11.1714 of one fourth of Spreyton Barton by Richard Risdon, gent. of Spreyton, to William Battishill, uncle of William Battishill party to this deed, now determinable on the death of William Battishill;
  • Lease of 27.7.1738 of one fourth part of Great Falkedon (wrongly called Higher Falkedon) by Nathaniel Risdon to William Battishill, for 99 years determinable on the deaths of WB and his daughters Jane and Susanna;
  • Lease of 16.12.1714 of one fourth of Cann’s or Middle Falkedon (wrongly named Higher Falkedon) and one fourth part of Church Woodland byRichard Risdon to WB the uncle for 99 years determinable on the deaths of WB the nephew and his brothers Thomas and Andrew, all sons of the late Andrew Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman;
  • Lease of 7.5.1753 of one fourth part of Stockey granted by Mary Risdon to WB the nephew for 99 years determinable on the lives of WB’s son and daughters William, Elizabeth and Mary;
  • Lease of 10.5.1710 of one fourth of Spreyton Mills granted by Richard Risdon to William Battishill the uncle for 99 years determinable on the deaths of Thomas, William and Barbara Battishill, children of Andrew Battishill.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 3 and 4.1.1758/9 (31 Geo II). Richard Hole, heir under the will of Mary Risdon of Spreyton, his aunt, of the lands that Mary inherited from her deceased son Nathaniel Risdon of Crediton, gent, conveys for £161 to George Cann of Spreyton, gent, his three-quarter interest in Higher Falkedon aka Higher Falkadon, aka Higher Falkingdon, but now commonly known as Middle Falkedon, formerly in the occupation of Thomas Battishill but now in the tenure of George Cann and Robert Williams as under-tenants of John Cann, the father of George; and also three-quarters of Churchwoodland belonging to Middle Falkedon; and also a fourth part of Lesser or Lower Falkedon, now in the tenure, occupation or possession of George Cann, Henry Shilstone, Walter Warren and John Pengelly as under-tenants of John Cann; and also a fourth of two fields which are part of Churchwoodland or are known as Churchwoodland and all Richard Hole’s other parts of Churchwoodland belonging to Middle or Lower Falkedon; and also one fourth ofa cottage and two gardens called Little Silver until now in the possession of Walter Cann. All the premises are part of the Manor of Spreyton and now in the tenure of John Cann, gentleman, or George Cann as his assignee or undertenant. Annual reserved rents are to be paid to Richard Hole and his heirs of 10s. 6d for the ¾ of Middle Falkedon; and 5s. 4d. for the ¼ of Lower Falkedon. The conveyance is subject to:

  • a 99-year lease of three quarters of Middle Falkedon (called in the lease Higher Falkedon) and of Churchwoodland dated 20.4.1738, granted by Nathaniel Risdon to John Cann, father of George, determinable on the deaths of John’s sons Wm., Mark and George (party hereto).
  • a 99-year lease of one quarter of Lower Falkedon and Churchwoodland dated 15.6.1715, granted by Richard Risdon of Spreyton, gent, to Andrew Battishill of Spreyton, yeoman, determinable on the deaths of Andrew’s sons Wm. and Thomas.
  • a 99-year lease of a quarter of the same premises dated 20.6.1752, granted byMary Risdon to John Cann the father, by the name of Lower Falkedon, and one quarter of two fields, part of Churchwoodland, determinable on the death ofGeorge Cann; the lease to begin after the deaths of William and Thomas Battishill;
  • a 99-year lease of one quarter of the cottage and two gardens called Little Silver, dated 29.9.1740 granted by Nathaniel Risdon to John Cann, determinable on the deaths of his sons William, Mark and George.

The rents due under these leases are now due to George. Other documents that Richard Hole undertakes to produce on demand are:

  • Indenture of 26.5.1696 between (1) Margaret Risdon of South Tawton, widow (one of the 3 sisters and co-heirs of John Furse, late of South Tawton, gent., and one of the 3 aunts and co-heirs of Mary Furse of Chubrooke in Staverton, spinster, late daughter of John Furse); (2) Katharine Codnor of Ipplepen, widow (another of the 3 sisters); (3) John Evans of Topsham, grocer, and his wife Elizabeth (the third sister); and (4) James Parsons of Shebbear, gent.; William Cullinge of Woodland, gent.; and Thomas Hole of Zealmonachorum, gent.
  • Indenture of 16.3.1713 between (1) Richard Risdon of Spreyton, gent.; (2) Robert Incledon of New Inn, London, gent.; and (3) Philip Furse the Younger, of Spreyton, gent.
  • Indenture of 15.10.1757 between (1) Richard Hole and his wife Juliana; (2) the aforesaid Thomas Hole, Clerk of North Tawton, Clerk; and (3) John Battishill of Drewsteignton, yeoman.

In the 1-year lease signed on 3.1.1758, the premises are leased to George Cann for 5s and a peppercorn rent.

Two copies of the conveyance survive, one signed Richd Hole, the other George Cann; witnesses: John Perry, Humphry Aram.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 17 and 18.2.1758/9 (31 George II). In the first document, William Battishill, yeoman of Spreyton, grants for 5s. a 1-year peppercorn lease of the properties to George Cann, yeoman of Spreyton. In the second indenture, William Battishill for £23.10s conveys to George Cann a barn and stable or shippen with linnies and curtilage lying on the NE side of the curtilage of the premises usually now called Middle Falkedon, and also two fields called the Plaistery and the Cole Garden, all part of a messuage now commonly known as Higher Falkedon. They were formerly in the possession of Thosmas Smith of Spreyton, and are now in the tenure of John Cann, yeoman, father of George, by virtue of an indenture dated 28.7.1739 (13 George II), whereby John Cann became entitled to two fourths of the premises for 99-year terms granted in each of the two fourths; each term was determinable on the deaths of Wm. Battishill and of his daughters Jane and Susanna Battishill; and also to the other half for a 99-year term determinable on the deaths of George, William (party to the present agreement) and Mark Cann, sons of John Cann, to the fee of which all the said premises William Battishill is now legally entitled. The conveyance also covers an adjoining waste plot of ground of about 6 land yards on which woodricks were usually made, part of the premises being conveyed. The parties agree that the remaining part of Higher Falkedon, of which the above premises are part, should be chargeable for all rates and taxes relating to the premises. A reserved annual rent of 2/6d remains payable to William Battishill and his heirs forever.

Signed: William Battishill. Witnesses: John Perry, William King.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

3.32.Lease of 21.3.1758 (31 Geo II)whereby William Battishill of Spreyton, gent., leased to George Cann of Spreyton, yeoman, all that part of Cann’s Falkedon and Great Falkedon lying on the SE side of the highway leading from Spreyton Town to Horracombe Moor, and also the moor known as Moses Moore on the NW side of the highway, together with 3 cottages, all which premises were at that time in the occupation of William Battishill or his under-tenants. William Battishill reserved to himself the two water grist mills and the houses and grounds which had formerly been enjoyed with the mills, all then in the possession of Jeremiah Milman (these plots are described in a memorandum as being orchards adjoining the mills and other plots on the lower side of the road leading from South Beer to Spreytonwood). William Battishill also reserved the right to the timber (oak, ash and elm). The lease was for 14 years from 25 March 1758 at an annual rent of £25. George Cann undertook to pay the Church and Poor Rates and tithes relating to the premises (calculated as being half the rates applicable to Cann’s Falkedon and Great Falkedon). He also undertook to perform all parish offices and to take all apprentices that might be imposed on the premises. William Battishill for his part undertook to pay the land tax and all unknown taxes and high and chief rents. There were also requirements as to the cultivation of the land (the tenant was for instance required to dress each acre that he ploughs with 8 hogsheads of lime ashes or 8 score seams of ‘good well rotten dung’) and as to the maintenance of the buildings (50 nitches of good reed had to be laid annually on the houses), and as to the crops to be left at the end of the tenancy.Signed Wm. Battishill. Witnesses: Mark Cann and John Dennaford.

In a memorandum at the end, George Cann leases to William Battishill the cottage and gardens on the road between Falkedon and Spreyton Town, then in the possession of Mark Callaway, for the same 14 years at an annual rent of £1. [This is possibly Little Silver.]

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Lease and release of 28/29.6.1771 whereby William Battishill of Spreyton Barton, gent., only son and heir of William Battishill of Spreyton Barton, deceased, conveys to George Cann of Spreyton, gent., for £12.12s.

  • an orchard or plot of ground of about 20 land yards, part of Great Faccaton, at the higher end of an orchard called Dippey Orchard in the possession of George Cann, who has lately taken down the hedge dividing them;
  • a half interest in a cottage in Spreyton called Walter Cann’s cottage and the garden and plots of land belonging to it, part of the Manor of Spreyton.

Signed William Battishill; witnesses: E. Whitefield, ?John Rundle junior.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

15.7.1853 and 22.11.1853: billsfor mason’s work and work on waggon linhay at Falkedon.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

1870/77 correspondence between George Lambert and William J. Battishill (a solicitor in Exeter) about the lopping of trees on GL’s property overhanging a linhay at Cann’s Falkedon (belonging to William. Harrington Battishill and in the occupation of Mssrs Hooper and Jackman). George Lambert refers to Battishill trees also overhanging other people’s property.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Undated list of Falkedon fields with their acreages (128 acres) (probably late 19th century).

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Abstract of title of the executors of William John Battishill, 1913.Concerns Barton, Cramphay, Higher Falkedon, Cann’s Falkedon and Joints Tenement (all in Spreyton), inherited from his uncle William Harrington Battishill.

Lease of 20.4.1922 whereby the Rt. Hon. Geo Lambert leases Falkedon to Mrs Emily Sampson by the year for £180 a year. An addendum of 15.9.1922 notes that £72.7s.6d was owing to GL on the death of her husband and will be paid by her at the end of her tenancy. No schedule attached. Voluminous standard conditions on inter alia cultivation. A manuscript note says that the first tenancy [ie presumably of the Sampson family] was Lady Day 1904.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

Copy of schedule (listing fields) to a lease of 28.11.1957 whereby The Rt. Hon. Viscount Lambert leased Falkedon (161 acres) to the Hon Geo. Lambert MP, his son.

(Lambert estate papers, Devon Record Office)

CENSUS RETURNS FOR FALKEDON AND ST CHERRIES

1841 census

St Cherries

William Vigers, age 72,blacksmith, and family

New building

Samuel Vigers, age 27, tailor

Mary Vigers, age 20

William Cork, age apprentice

St Cherries

John Waye, age 55, thatcher

Jane Waye, age 50

Lucy Waye, age 20

Elizabeth Vigers, age 12

John Hill, age 11

Falkedon

John Kelland, age 38, farmer

Elizabeth Kelland, age 35

Elizabeth Kelland, age 10

Matilda Kelland, age 8

Frances Kelland, age 7

Mary Kelland, age 4

John Kelland, age 3

Sarah Scott, age 27, governess

Fanny Stone, age 18

Elizabeth Smale, age 15, apprentice

Mary Jenkins, age 13, apprentice

William White, age 19, apprentice

John Setter, age 16, apprentice

William Odes, age 13, apprentice

Emmanuel Odes, age 7, apprentice

William Counter, age 13, agricultural labourer

St Cherries Cottage [this presumably either the little cottage on the corner of Water Lane or Little Silver]

George Anstey, age 38, agricultural labourer

Elizabeth Anstey, age 40

Phebe Anstey, age 7

Grace Anstey, age 5

Lower Falkedon [this may be Falkedon Cottages]

Richard Stentiford, age 46, agricultural labourer

Grace Stentiford, age 40

Mary Stentiford, age 14

Richard Stentiford, age 9

Elizabeth Stentiford, age 5

William Stentiford, age 3

Samuel Heard, age 43, agricultural labourer

Grace Heard, age 42

Mary Stentiford, age 12

George Woodley, age 56, agricultural labourer

Mary Woodley, age 58

1851 census

Falkadon

Samuel Powlesland, age 53, farmer of 275 acres, employing 3 labourers

Jane (wife)

Samuel (son)

Rhoda Sampson, age 14, house servant

Maria Harvey, age 10, house servant

James Clarke, age 18, farm servant

John Webber, age 18, farm servant

Robert Curson, age 16, farm servant

Cann’s Falkadon

Richard Stentiford, agricultural labourer and wife Grace, son William and lodger William Smale

John Coombe, age 39, agricultural labourer, with wife Jane and son John

Lower Falkadon

Samuel Heard, age 52, agricultural labourer, and wife Grace

St Cherries

John Waye, age 66, thatcher, with wife Jane and grandchildren Elizabeth (surname illegible] and John Hill, thatcher

Little Silver

John Vanstone, age 24, agricultural labouer, and wife Ann

1861 census

Falkadon

Samuel Powlesland, age 63, widower, farmer of 460 acres, employing 5 labourers

John Powlesland (married son), age 40

Mirriam Powlesland (son’s wife), age 38

Their daughters Lucy and Susan

Mary Osborn, age 21, house servant

Elizabeth Hill, age 12, dairy maid

John Yeo, age 18, apprentice agricultural labourer

James Tucket, age 18, carter

William Tucket, age 14, carter

John Combe, age 13, servant

John Wonnacott, age 13, servant

Falkadon Cottage 1

Thomas Savin, age 38, agricuktural labourer, with wife Ann and children William and Maria

Falkadon Cottage 2

John Combe, age, agricultural labourer; wife Jane; daughter Elizabeth and son William who is visiting – he is aged 22 and a gentleman’s servant.

Falkadon Cottage 3

Richard Stentaford, age 66, agricultural labourer, with his wife Grace

Little Silver

John Stentaford, age 30, agricultural labourer, with wife Hannah; son Richard; and lodger William Arscott age 56, unmarried agricultural labourer.

St Cherries

William Gribble, age 33,agricultural labourer, with wife Elizabeth and children John, Elizabeth and William

John Waye, age 75, thatcher, and wife Jane

Lower Falkedon [probably the farmyard just north of Falkedon that has now disappeared]

John Manning, age 30, agricultural labourer, with wife Mary, daughter Susan and unmarried lodger William Powlesland, age 62, agricultural labourer

1871 census

Falkadon

Samuel Jackman, age 58, farming 220 acres and employing 1 labourer

Mary (wife), age 48

Sons John, Samuel and William, ages 24, 20 and 17

Daughters Elizabeth, Ellen, Jessie, Anne, age 22, 13, 8 and 3

Sophia Seward, age 12, general servant

Samuel Arscott, age 19, farm servant, living in

Henry Easterbrook, farm servant, living in

Falkadon Cottages

Thomas Savin age 46, agricultural labourer, wife Ann and daughters Maria, Ann, Lucy

John Coombe, age 60, agricultural labourer; wife Jane; unmarried son John (a tailor) and daughter Elizabeth

James Drew, age 50, agricultural labourer; wife Eliza; son and daughter and 2 boarders

Little Silver

William Webber, age 34, agricultural labourer; wife Jane; 2 sons and 2 daughters

Mount Pleasant

Presumably another cottage that has disappeared, or possibly another name for the cottage across the road from St Cherries

Eliza Wadman, age 49, widow, charwoman

William Wadman (son) age 22 and his wife

Mary Moor (daughter) and her husband William;

4 “visitors”

Lower Falkadon

It is not clear which of the two Lower Falkedons this is, but probably the one near the main Falkedon farmhouse.

Thomas Seaward, age 50, agricultural labourer; wife Betsy, daughter Emma and son William

St Cherries

William Beer, age 25, agricultural labourer; wife Harriet, daughters Elizabeth and Rhoda

John Manning, age 40, agricultural labourer; wife Mary; daughters susanna and Mary Ann; sons John and George

1881 Census

Falkadon

Thomas Howard, age 37, farmer of 216 acres, employing 3 labourers and 1 boy

Mary (wife), age 39

Sons William, and Thomas and daughters Mary and Susan

Thomas Howard, widower age 71, retired farmer

Mary Wonnacott, age 19, general servant

Samuel Jolley, age 21, farm servant, living in.

Robert Jolley, age 23, farm servant, living in.

Falkadon Cottages

Robert Yeo, age 49, agricultural labourer

Ruth (wife), age 37; 2 sons and 3 daughters

William Wonnacott, age 64, agricultural labourer

Jane (wife) and daughter Elizabeth (servant)

James Coombe, age 30, agricultural labourer

Alice (wife), age 31; 1 son, 3 daughters

Little Silver

William Webber, age 44, agricultural labourer

Jane (wife); 1 daughter, 2 sons

St Cherries

Thomas Lee, age 34, agricultural labourer,

Eliza (wife); 1 son and 4 daughters

Anne Redstone (boarder), age 5

William Martin, age 38, widower, agricultural labourer

2 daughters

Mary Martin (mother), age 63, housekeeper

Falkadon Cottage

Presumably the small cottage on the other side of the road from St Cherries

Thomas Seaward, age 60, agricultural labourer, and wife.

1891 census

Falkadon (unspecified, so probably includes Falkedon Cottages plus Falkedon farm, which may have been given over to two families of labourers)

Samuel Adams, age 58, agricultural labourer

Caroline Adams, age 58

Son Richard, age 18, agricultural labourer; and daughter Catherine age 15

Widowed mother-in-law Mary Francis, age 92.

George Brooks, age 38, agricultural labourer

Eliza Brooks, age 40

Sons John and Fred aged 10 and 5 months; and daughters Jane, Mary, Jessie, Edith aged 11,8,5 and 2

William Jolley, boarder, aged 81, widower, retired labourer

John Kelly, age 40, boarder, agricultural labourer

John Tremblett (possibly a mistake for Tremlett), age 38, stone-breaker (for making roads)

Mary (wife), age 38, laundress

Sons William and Samuel, 10 and 2; daughter Mary, 3

James Webber, age 65, agricultural labourer

Priscilla (wife), age 70

Mary Howard, age 45 tailoress

Thomas Lee, age 40, agricultural labourer

Eliza (wife), age 43

Daughters Susan and Emma, ages 13 and 10.

Little Silver

William Wonnacott, age 33, agricultural labourer

Maria (wife), age 30

Daughters Elizabeth and Ethel, ages 5 and 3; and son Alfred William age 10 months

Lower Falkadon (this is probably either Falkedon or the farmhouse to the north that has disappeared, as Johns is recorded in the next census as promoted to hind or estate manager)

William Johns, age 54, agricultural labourer

Rebecca (wife), age 54

Daughter Emma, age 15

St Cherries

St Cherries was marked on the 1889 Ordnance Survey as a smithy, so the Washplants were presumably living in the present St Cherries or part of it. One of the other families may also have been living in St Cherries, and the other in the cottage across the road.

William Martin, age 49, agricultural labourer

Mary Martin (mother), widow, age 73

William Woodley, age 34, agricultural labourer

Charlotte (wife), age

Daughters Una and Florence, ages 13 and 6; and sons [illegible] and Edgar, ages 10 and 3

Lewis Washplant, age 26, blacksmith

Edith (wife) age 25

Daughters Edith and Mabel, aged 3 and 1

1901 census

Falkedon

William Johns, age 65, hind (i.e. bailiff or estate manage, probably working for George Lambert M.P.)

Rebecca Johns, age 55

The following families were probably at Falkedon cottages, working for the Battishill family.

Thomas Lee, age 59, labourer on farm

Eliza Lee, age 53

Daughter Susan, age 23 and grandson Sydney age 4

Mary ?Howard, age 56, tailoress

John Lee, age 55, general labourer

Susanna Lee, age 45

Daughters Maria, Emma, Elizabeth, Florence and Mabel and son Thomas.

Elizabeth Lee, widow, age 27, annuitant 9i.e. living on her own income, possibly a pension)

Sons William and John age 4 and 2, and daughter Emma age 1

St Cherries

No distinction is made in this census return between St Cherries and the two nearby cottages that have now disappeared.

William Woodley, age 46, farmer

Charlotte Woodley, age 43

Sons (name illegible) age 20, apprentice carpenter and Edgar, age 13

Daughters Blanche and Dorothy, ages 19 and 2 months

Mark Sanders, age 40, ordinary agricultural labourer

Susan Woodley, age 37

Sons William and Frank, ages 13 and 7

Daughter Emily, 9

Maria Wonnacott, age 40 (she is not widowed, so her husband, probably a farm labourer, was probably absent

Son Alfred age 10 and daughters Jessie and ?Elizabeth ages 7 and 4.

William Webber, age 64, ordinary farm labourer

Jane Webber, age 60

Son George, age 40, single, labourer on farm

1911 census

Falkedon Farm

George Sampson, age 40, farmer

Emily Sampson, age 35

Sons Gordon, John, Edgar and Horace Sampson, ages 7-14

Daughter Gladys Sampson, age 1

Grand-daughter Rose Sampson, aged 1 month

Annie Gillard, age 50, visitor

Elizabeth Lee, age 15, servant

Falkedon Cottages

John Lee, age 65, farm labourer

Susanna Lee, age 55

Son William Henry Lee, age 33, farm labourer

Daughters Maria (domestic servant), Florence Emily and Mabel, ages 23, 12 and 10

Grand-daughter Nora Cecelia Lee, age 6

Philip Brooks, age 54, farm labourer

Emma Brooks, age 58

Daughter Alice Brooks, age 15

John Lang, age 72, farm labourer

Elizabeth Lang, age 75

St Cherries

No distinction is made in this census return between St Cherries and the two nearby cottages that have now disappeared.

John Martin, age 46,farm labourer

Emma Martin, age 45

Daughters Ellen, Beatrice, Emily and May, ages 10,8,6,4.

Abraham Cann, age 33, farm labourer

Florence Cann, age 28

Daughters Lily and Eliza, ages 4 and 1

John Ware, age 57, farm labourer

Amy Jury, age 25, widowed daughter

Dorothy Jury, age 2

William Woodley, age 58, farming

Charlotte Woodley, age 57

Son Edgar Clark Woodley, age 22, farm labourer

Daughter Pearl Dorothy Woodley, age 10

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